Members of the Buprestidae family, like this golden buprestid (Buprestis aurulenta), are often called ‘jewel beetles’ due to their spectacular iridescent colours and patterns. This iridescence comes from the way microscopic textures in their cuticle reflect certain frequencies of light, much in the same way a CD does.

Members of the Buprestidae family, like this golden buprestid (Buprestis aurulenta), are often called ‘jewel beetles’ due to their spectacular iridescent colours and patterns. This iridescence comes from the way microscopic textures in their cuticle reflect certain frequencies of light, much in the same way a CD does.

(Source: fuckyeahbeetles)

A coloured scanning electro micrograph of Tribolium castaneum, the red flower beetle.

A coloured scanning electro micrograph of Tribolium castaneum, the red flower beetle.

A ladybird (Coccinella sp.) lifts its elytra (hardened protective forewings) and releases its hindwings in preparation for flight.

A ladybird (Coccinella sp.) lifts its elytra (hardened protective forewings) and releases its hindwings in preparation for flight.

Orange blister beetle (Mylabris pustulata)

Orange blister beetle (Mylabris pustulata)

To defend themselves from potential predators, blister beetles (Meloidae) are known to secrete a toxic chemical called cantharidin that causes blistering to the skin. Diluted solutions of cantharidin are used as topical medication in the removal of warts and tattoos.

To defend themselves from potential predators, blister beetles (Meloidae) are known to secrete a toxic chemical called cantharidin that causes blistering to the skin. Diluted solutions of cantharidin are used as topical medication in the removal of warts and tattoos.

rhamphotheca:

Redder Ladybirds Are Deadlier
Provided by Univ. of Exeter 
A ladybird’s colour indicates how well-fed and how toxic it is, according to an international team of scientists. Research led by the Universities of Exeter and Liverpool directly shows that differences between animals’ warning signals reveal how poisonous individuals are to predators.
Published today in the journal Functional Ecology,  the research shows that redder ladybirds are more poisonous than their  paler peers. The study reveals that this variation is directly linked to  diet in early life, with better-fed ladybirds being more visible and  more deadly.
Ecologists have long assumed that there are no individual differences  between the warning signals of animals of the same species. More  recently, scientists have identified variation between individuals’  warning signals, but have not known if these differences were meaningful  and linked to levels of toxicity…
(read more: PhysOrg)    
(photo: Coccinella magnifica, by   Gilles San Martin)
**********
More information:
http://www.functionalecology.org/view/0/summaries.html#ladybird

rhamphotheca:

Redder Ladybirds Are Deadlier

Provided by Univ. of Exeter

A ladybird’s colour indicates how well-fed and how toxic it is, according to an international team of scientists. Research led by the Universities of Exeter and Liverpool directly shows that differences between animals’ warning signals reveal how poisonous individuals are to predators.

Published today in the journal , the research shows that redder ladybirds are more poisonous than their paler peers. The study reveals that this variation is directly linked to diet in early life, with better-fed ladybirds being more visible and more deadly.

Ecologists have long assumed that there are no individual differences between the warning signals of animals of the same species. More recently, scientists have identified variation between individuals’ warning signals, but have not known if these differences were meaningful and linked to levels of

(read more: PhysOrg)    

(photo: Coccinella magnifica, by Gilles San Martin)

**********

More information:

http://www.functionalecology.org/view/0/summaries.html#ladybird

The red-femured milkweed borer (Tetraopes femoratus) takes its name from its habit of hosting on milkweed plants. The beetle is able to successfully ingest the plant’s milky secretions, a substance that is toxic to most herbivores, making it poisonous or distasteful to potential predators.

The red-femured milkweed borer (Tetraopes femoratus) takes its name from its habit of hosting on milkweed plants. The beetle is able to successfully ingest the plant’s milky secretions, a substance that is toxic to most herbivores, making it poisonous or distasteful to potential predators.

There are around 1,200 different species of stag beetle (family: Lucanidae) who take their name from the male’s large developed mandibles that resemble antlers. These appendages are used to wrestle and fight over mating sites.

There are around 1,200 different species of stag beetle (family: Lucanidae) who take their name from the male’s large developed mandibles that resemble antlers. These appendages are used to wrestle and fight over mating sites.

While the banded alder borer (Rosalia funebris) are mostly found on dead or dying trees, they have been found to have a unique attraction to fresh paint, which researchers suggest is due to pheromones. A number of the beetles have even been found drowned in pots of paint at a paint shop in Ukiah, California.

While the banded alder borer (Rosalia funebris) are mostly found on dead or dying trees, they have been found to have a unique attraction to fresh paint, which researchers suggest is due to pheromones. A number of the beetles have even been found drowned in pots of paint at a paint shop in Ukiah, California.

Anthrenus verbasci, otherwise known as the varied carpet beetle, is arguably the most commonly known beetle in the dermestidae family (the skin beetles). Its larval stage’s appetite for natural fibres and organic textiles has earned the species a fearsome reputation among museums and taxidermy collectors alike.

Anthrenus verbasci, otherwise known as the varied carpet beetle, is arguably the most commonly known beetle in the dermestidae family (the skin beetles). Its larval stage’s appetite for natural fibres and organic textiles has earned the species a fearsome reputation among museums and taxidermy collectors alike.